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Explore the bluebell woods in Surrey…

March 31st 2016
By: Melanie Hollidge
Explore the bluebell woods in Surrey…

We’ve experienced a very floral spring this year in Surrey, beds lined with Narcissi, Tulips and snow drops, the clocks have gone forward and we can all start to enjoy longer, milder days by getting outdoors and exploring some of the beautiful countryside we have just on our doorstep.
 
The county of Surrey is the most wooded county in the whole of the England - 22.4% of the county is covered in woodland and because of this we can enjoy some of the most spectacular displays of blue bells.
 
Here are some of the best woods and places in Surrey to enjoy Blue Bells this Spring:
 
Banstead Woods, near Chipstead – is a great wood for walkers looking to enjoy the bluebell walk.
 
Branslands and Harewoods - always have a great display of bluebells each year.
 
Nower Wood, is one of the oldest woods in Surrey covering 80 acres this is a great site to see bluebells.
 
Old Simms Cops, near Abinger – this is one of the largest bluebells woods on the North Downs.
 
Wallis Wood, near Forest Green  - this has vast swathes of bluebells in spring.
 
Sheepleas, Horsley - this woodland is of Special Scientific interest as there are 300 acres of woodlands, covering a diverse range of landscapes, including chalk slopes and wildflower meadows, supporting a large range of wildlife. 
 
Rhododendron Wood, Leith Hill -These woodlands are open to the public all year around, and are a great place to explore some of Surrey’s woodland. The Rhododendron wood was planted in the late 19th Century and is stunning in spring and early summer.
 
Ashtead Common, Ashtead - This woodland is also a site of Scientific interest. It has a rare type of veteran pollarded oaks dating back to the 17th and 18th Centuries. The woodland has not changed for centuries, enabling visitors to step back in time and have the rare glimpse of rare and endangered species which take refuge in these woodlands.

Source: SurreyLife

Photo: Denbies Vineyard