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Landlords...the importance of a tidy garden this summer

August 5th 2016
By: Mary.Wilkins
Landlords...the importance of a tidy garden this summer

Summer is upon us and if you haven’t already tidied up your garden for a summer rental, then now is the time to do it. The desirability of a property isn’t always based on what’s between its four walls, well-designed, tidy garden areas can make a property seem much more attractive to tenants. It also shows that as a landlord you care, which in turn will give you happier tenants who might rent for a longer duration.
 
The basic needs for a tenant is to have an area where they can sit outside, hang-out washing and store their rubbish bins.
 
Although a tenant will be attracted to a nice garden it’s important that it’s low maintenance. Create beds that are planted with low-maintenance plants, such as succulents, as these don't need much watering or subsistence. The BBC has a list of their top ten low-maintenance plants these include: Miscanthus sinensis ‘Zebrinus’, Mahonia x media ‘Charity’, Liriope muscari, Lily turf, for the full list please follow this link.
 
Large areas of gravel or decking look good and are relatively low in maintenance compared to grass. Each year or between a tenancy clean theseusing a power jet and they will look as good as new.  
 
If you do have a lawn make sure the grass it is cut, the borders are trimmed and flowerbeds are weed free, any graveled areas might need sweeping and de-weeding before a viewing.
 
Goodfellows Cheam Village has this lovely three bedroom detached house for rent for £2,000 per month. The owner of this property has created an attractive garden with a circular grass area with a boarder of bricks and paving slabs. The beds are full with herbaceous, low-maintenance plants which look pretty but are easy to look after.
 
If you would like to find out more about this property then please call Goodfellows Cheam on 020 8643 5252 or follow this link.
 
Source: BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/htbg2/flat/module7/top_ten_plants1.shtml